Professional accomplishment – first steps

The first term was a bit of a blur really. Having done the job for a year it was easier in a lot of ways but I am not sure it was any less busy. I think it just enabled me to spend a little more time on some areas that I think have a lot more impact in the longer term but there is still plenty more I would like to have done. (That is teaching I guess – work in progress and do the best you can at the time. Don’t lose heart over the things you could have done better. That is for next lesson/week/term/year).

The term finished with a professional learning day with others from the Wollongong Diocese who are working towards the higher levels of the NSW institute of teachers – professional accomplishment and leadership. It was great to be able to discuss with others the requirements of   the process and it certainly helped me clarify a plan of attack to move forward.

Part of the plan of attack is to try and keep most of the process and documents I will be using as shared documents and public documents so that others may benefit and I can refer to them later if required to help others through the process. A key theme of professional accomplishment is sharing and working with other teachers so I think this approach is appropriate.

I aim to use the support document as a guide and annotate to show the evidence I am thinking of using. By linking documents to this I think it can provide a good framework to organise the resources and evidence I intend on using. Hopefully this will be useful to others also in the long run.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16WiigypIdvFG1ZBhasrErx8Lv2lVez_EyuW7FXCdEzk/edit

Concerns – It appears to be a huge process to show that you meet each of the 7 standards and 42 elements and require evidence that you are consistently meeting these standards over time (not that it should be easy and I see merit in it being a rigorous process). While I feel they are things that I am doing regularly the task of organising this evidence will take considerable time.

Referee’s are required to validate some of the standards and this still to me is a big ask of other people. (Max 250 words per element you ask them to be a referee – (4 elements = 1000 words!) They also need to register in the Institute site for a number to be able to act as a referee. Bit of a hard sell here I think!

I guess going through the process early may assist but I think over time this will be a big ask of  other teachers, particularly Principals who appear to be required as referee’s for all people working towards accreditation at the higher levels. From what I have seen, Principals are pretty busy already. I wonder how sustainable this model may be? Not that it is a bad process but I can see issues moving forward as more people work towards these levels.

My concerns are not outweighed by the potential benefits and professional learning I anticipate by going through the process so I am approaching this in a positive manner.

My goal over the holidays is to annotate each standard with my ideas for the evidence I will use and hopefully include one piece of evidence that will be fully annotated for a range of elements.

See how we go.

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2 Responses

  1. hi Brad, it seems like the picture painted is not the one espoused by the Institute. They claim the process is rigorous but not onerous on the participants. I like the idea of using shared documents so that others can learn and develop from your ideas and hopefully contribute as well.
    Cheers

    • After I finish going through the process I may have a different opinion but at this stage it appears to be more on the onerous side. My biggest concern is that it places a lot of work on other people for a person to be accredited and I am not sure how well this will scale when we are trying to get a lot of people to complete the process.
      I can see that it is difficult to find a balance between the process being rigorous and valid and not being overly burdensome and unreasonable. Time will tell I suppose!
      Cheers
      Brad

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